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Friday, April 10, 2015

Erased by a Birth Certificate

Posted on August 27, 2014 by Jessica

In light of the recent events surrounding the CDC whistleblower.
Guest post by Bobby Dee
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Have you seen the headlines screaming about the CDC vaccine researcher leaking documents that show the CDC knew in 2002 that the MMR vaccine was causing autism 3.36 times more often in African American toddlers who received it prior to the age of 3?
Yeah, me neither.  Welcome to the media black-out.
In the event you need to be brought up to speed on the fraud perpetrated by the CDC on the American people for the past decade, start here, here, here and here.  Here’s the speedy version:
Dr. Bill Thomspon co-authored the CDC study of school children in Atlanta that investigated whether the age at which children were vaccinated with the MMR correlated with an autism diagnosis.  The answer, for black children at least, was a resounding yes.  Thompson didn’t want to have to present that information to hostile autism parents and asked for guidance in what to do.  The answer– from another author on the paper–  was to make it go away.
How do you make black children in Atlanta disappear from a study?  Require their mothers to produce a Georgia birth certificate.  41% could not, were kicked out, and the impact of the MMR went right along with them.  Dr. Coleen Boyle then sang the praises of the MMR in front of a congressional committee in April of 2002 and the Atlanta study has been used countless times to prove that autism is not related to the MMR vaccine.
Earlier in 2014 Dr. Brian Hooker analyzed the raw data obtained through a Freedom of Information request and published about the 3.36 factor of autism (236%) increase, although the CDC has already forced the journal to take it down in the name of causing harm to the public.  Click that first link fast before PubMed takes it down too.
The CDC responded to the commotion caused by the iReport on Monday, claiming that the Georgia birth certificate allowed researchers to view important autism risk factors such as the mother’ age, mother’s education level (because we all know college educated mothers don’t have autistic children, right?), child’s gestational age at birth (always an exact science), and weight when born.
Well, OK.  That’s understandable, right?  Underweight babies, premature babies, they’re more prone to become autistic.  Except, wait a minute.  The objective of the study was to compare ages of vaccination with the MMR to autism diagnosis, not prematurity, birth weight, or mom’s academic ambitions.  The rest of that information is not even relevant to the objective, so why were they asking for it?  Who were they going to eliminate?  The college educated mothers or the high school drop-outs?
Let’s just say for the sake of argument that knowing if mom only went to undergrad or continued on to get a master’s degree was crucial information.  Therefore it was imperative that the mothers produce those birth certificates because God forbid the researchers just asked mothers what their education level was or how old they were when their child was born.
Fine.  I can buy that.  So, this was all going on when?  2001-2002?  And they were looking at children aged 3 to 5, is that fair to say?  So a birth certificate that would have been produced might have been for a child born in 1997?  Perfect.  Let’s a have look here at a 1997 valid Georgia birth certificate and scan for the mother’s education level, baby’s birth weight, and gestational age when born.


Did you find it?
Me neither.  You know why?  Birth certificates are federally regulated and none of that stuff is printed on them.
OK, fine!  Maybe the CDC misspoke and what they meant to say was, “We needed the long form birth certificate application that contains the autism risk factor information we were looking for.”
Yes.  Except parents don’t get to keep those applications.
Try again?  Maybe they were saying, “We needed the birth certificates in order to access the database where the information contained on the long form application for a birth certificate is stored.”
Oh, I get it now.  So, not the actual birth certificate because everyone knows those don’t contain that information, and not the birth certificate application because those are sent directly to a state’s vital records office, but it’s the database that we’re talking about.  I understand.
Wait, is it this database?  The National Vital Statistics System?  That’s where the critical autism factor information is that the CDC needed to access?  Because– call me crazy–  but the CDC owns that system and I’m pretty sure they don’t need no stinking birth certificate to access it.
Does this all boil down to the CDC deciding, after generating extremely negative results about the MMR with regard to the African American community, that they needed the birth certificates to positively ID the children who were already included in their study so that they could then access a database that they already own?  Because that just sounds crazy.
Almost as crazy as introducing a birth certificate requirement to a study after it’s already finished and knocking out 41% of the participants, but not quite.

What can you do about it?


Contact your US Representative and Senator and tell them you want an investigation into the CDC.



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From:  http://gianelloni.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/erased-by-a-birth-certificate/

The blog is marked private, so I grabbed the article and text from another archived post.


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